1,000 Universities: IBM’s Ambitious Plan to Fill Vacant Blockchain Jobs

There's a staffing problem in the blockchain industry: simply, there are too many open positions and too few blockchain specialists.

Now, to help meet that rapidly increasing demand, IBM is partnering with Baruch College, Fordham University, University of Arkansas, University at Buffalo and the University of British Columbia to establish a series of grants, design blockchain curricula and more.

In addition, IBM has added new blockchain resources to it's IBM Academic Initiative, an ambitious effort that opens resources from the global tech giant to 1,000 universities.

But while unique in its sheer scope, IBM's new push is just the latest in a series of efforts around the world to train new blockchain industry talent.

Marie Wieck, general manager of IBM Blockchain, described the results of a beta release of the program to CoinDesk:

"We’ve already gotten some very, very positive responses."

Hands-on learning

Wieck also revealed details about how the programs will leverage IBM's technology.

To start with, IBM Blockchain Platform, the firm's proprietary distributed ledger technology, will form a part of the university curriculum, and will be made accessible for students.

Further, universities that participate in the projects will receive six months access to IBM Cloud and use of the IBM Blockchain cloud sandbox.

And it's becoming increasingly easy to see how such skills would be put to use by graduates of the courses.

The announcement comes on the same day that IBM formally launched its IBM Blockchain Platform, a food supply chain consortium with Walmart and other major firms on board, and revealed the first ever startup accelerator aimed at investing in startups building with Hyperledger Fabric.

Student lockers image via Shutterstock

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Stephen Hodgkiss
Chief Engineer at MarketHive

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Alan Zibluk Market Hive Founding Member

No it is not New Years Eve but here is a promise I am making

What is it with working online that is so great … the possibility of flexible hours, working on cutting edge technlology projects, meeting thousands of people spread across the globe ???

frustrated at working online

That of course does happen but at what cost to your sanity?

I have met some amazing people online, that is a fact, but I have also met some real assholes and snakes too. From unfilled promises, to downright abuse of trust is the tip of the iceberg.

I vow this; if I ever get to the point where any one of my ventures gives me enough capital to hangup my coding gloves, I will do it big time. 

By this I mean, I will delete all my social media accounts, terminate my online phone numbers, terminate all my website domains, terminate all my hosting accounts, close my Skype account etc etc… You get the picture.

I will then go live away from it all, next to a beach or lake and say goodbye to the 'new era of technology'. Maybe it is coming sooner that I could hope for.

If you believe that my message is worth spreading, please use the share buttons if they show on this page.

Stephen Hodgkiss
Chief Engineer at MarketHive

markethive.com


Alan Zibluk Market Hive Founding Member

Thieves target tourists in Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon)

Unfortunately, on 2 separate occasions this week, myself and my girlfriend have fallen foul of this. First time, 2 guys drove past the girlfriend and snatched her handbag .. luckily she was not hurt. She lost her phone, ATM cards and her Thai ID card. Second time, I was waiting outside a food takeaway place with my phone in my hand, waiting on an Uber taxi to turn up. A guy came from behind, snatched my phone and started running down the street. He then jumped on to his friends motorbike and sped off. I tried to give chase but fell over and grazed my hand.

The locals on both occasions just stood by and did nothing to help. If this happened in Thailand, they would have surely helped.

Ho Chi Minh City high crime rate

After more than 30 years of travelling the world to maybe 30 countries, this is first time I have experienced something like this. I do not feel safe and have cut my trip short and will return to Thailand in 2 days time.

My advice to others wanting to travel to Vietnam, is do not. There are plenty of other countries who are happy to take our tourist dollars without having to look over our shoulders 24/7.

Here is a quote from a government website: –

Despite the high crime rating for Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), most visitors feel relatively safe. Random violent crime against foreigners is relatively rare, and the level of crime is comparable to other cities of a similar size throughout Asia. Visitors regularly fall victim to property crimes, which are usually non-confrontational crimes of opportunity. Pickpocketing, purse slashing, bag snatching, and the theft of valuables is a common occurrence, particularly in areas frequented by tourists and business travelers. Maintaining an extremely high level of 360 degree situational awareness and alertness is critical to reduce the likelihood of becoming a victim of petty street crime.

Theft by motor scooter is a popular modus operandi wherein thieves grab bags/purses from victims while speeding by. This approach can cause serious injury to victims if they are unable to quickly release themselves from the straps of the bag, leaving them to be dragged by the motor scooter at high speeds. Carrying bags on the arm opposite the road and walking away from the edge of the curb can discourage potential motor scooter thieves. Smart phones, particularly iPhones and Androids, are very popular with thieves and are snatched out of victims’ hands by passing motor scooter thieves.

….End Quote….

Please share and make others aware the dangers of this country. I do not think I will ever come back.

Alan Zibluk Market Hive Founding Member

Shopping Mall Bans Bitcoin and Ether Mining as Merchants Run Up Bills

Article Posted on Coindesk:  Aug 7, 2017, at 10:00 UTC by Wolfie Zhao

An electronics retail marketplace in South Korea has reportedly taken the unusual step of banning vendors from mining Bitcoin in their stores.

Yongsan Market, based in Seoul, has told merchants that they aren't allowed to mine cryptocurrencies – Bitcoin and ether, specifically – because of electrical costs, rising temperatures and the risk of fire, according to Korea Economic Daily.

According to the report, the Yongsan Market's management has also warned merchants that the subsequent jump in electricity costs will be added to their bills.

The unusual decision is notable given the size of the market (the site boasts thousands of retail storefronts) and is a reflection of the growing popularity of small-scale cryptocurrency mining, of ether especially. As such, it's perhaps unsurprising that some vendors – particularly those that sell the graphics cards needed to mine cryptocurrencies – are using their own products to reap additional income.

Still, the incident comes at a time when the country is starting to demonstrate an increasing interest in cryptocurrencies.

According to Coin Market Cap data, the Korean cryptocurrency exchange Bithumb is now ranked first in terms of trading volume across global platforms, amassing a total of over $342 million in the last 24 hours. 
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A low-cost mining opportunity is available at in the USA. Check out the Firstmover Product Offer at http://bitqyck.me/389978

Alan Zibluk Market Hive Founding Member